Bardic's Giant Whatever

I just had to reschedule an appointment because a house was blocking the road.

…okay, so it was a mobile home, but the other way sounds funnier.

masamim:

source: official Capcom Japan

artist: 菊野郎さん

translation: me

…but…but what happened to the forged Totally Legit Suicide Note that was written by Celeste herself and No One Else in the attempt to incriminate anyone in particular? *cough*

masamim:

source: official Capcom Japan

artist: 菊野郎さん

translation: me

So Whooooooooop = Uwoooooooooooooo!!!

…oh crap that is too damn cute

cute flower questions (that u should totally ask me!!!!!!!!!)
Daisy: How old were you when you had your first kiss?
Carnation: If I handed you a concert ticket right now, who would you want to be the performer?
Jasmine: What color looks best on you?
foxglove: Name three facts about your family?
Allium: What's the best thing you can cook?
Orange Blossom: If you could pick the gender and appearance of your child, would you?
Calla Lily: If you died right now, what song would you want to play at your funeral?
Poinsettia: Favorite holiday dish?
Oxlip: Would you ever get into a long distance relationship?
Primrose: Favorite kind of soup?
Daffodil: What's the most thoughtful present you've ever received?
Rose: Are you currently in love with someone?
Amsonia: Would you ever become a vegan?
Peony: What's your favorite hot beverage?
Tulip: For your birthday, what kind of cake do you ask for?
Myrtle: Do you like going on airplanes?
Hibiscus: Did you ever play an instrument? If so what?
Zinnia: Who was your best friend when you were six years old?
Poppy: What color was your childhood home?
Hydrangea: Starbucks order?
Violet: Do you like where you're from?
Locust: What was your favorite book as a child?
Rhododendron: What's the scariest dream you've ever had?
Queen Anne's Lace: Would you rather carve pumpkins or wrap presents?
Magnolia: Favorite kind of candy?
Aster: Would you rather be cold or hot?
Marigold: Do you listen to what's on the radio?
Heliconia: Do you like when it rains?
Azalea: What's a movie you cried while watching?
Dandelion: Do you think you're important?
goingloco:

Liam that is some windy field you’re sitting on.
My first Cuanta Vida fanart, I really love this comic. Go read it.

goingloco:

Liam that is some windy field you’re sitting on.

My first Cuanta Vida fanart, I really love this comic. Go read it.

masamim:

source: official Capcom Japan

artist: 菊野郎さん

translation: me

Oh wow…so he’s officially a soft-hearted cat person. XD  

…for a given value of soft-hearted.  

Write me a TBH (To be Honest), stating an honest fact or thought you feel about me. Or just something honest you wanna say to me. Start the sentence off with “Tbh”.

Sure, why not

preservedcucumbers:

Okay Tumblr, I need help with this tablet monitor.

The Yiynova MSP19U has been an amazing monitor that works like a dream, but I’m finding that I have one tiny issue with it.

When in dual monitor mode, the pen can’t calibrate in SAI.

This seems to only happen in…

I don’t know if this would help with the second monitor thing, but I’ve seen at least one person talking about how this app , which is for helping smooth out shaky lines in various drawing programs, also helped them with their pressure sensitivity settings on their monoprice tablet.  

Maybe it might help with the tablet monitor, too?  Might be worth a shot.

Ahem:
Etymology[edit]




Autumn in suburban Canterbury, Victoria, Australia


The word autumn comes from the ancient Etruscan root autu- and has within it connotations of the passing of the year.[8] It was borrowed by the neighboring Romans, and became the Latin word autumnus.[9] After the Roman era the word continued to be used as the Old French word autompne (automne in modern French), and was later normalised to the original Latin. In theMedieval period there are rare examples of its use as early as the 12th century, but by the 16th century it was in common use.
Before the 16th century, harvest was the term usually used to refer to the season, as it is common in other West Germanic languagesto this day (cf. Dutch herfst, German Herbst and Scots hairst). However, as more people gradually moved from working the land to living in towns (especially those who could read and write,[citation needed] the only people whose use of language we now know), the word harvest lost its reference to the time of year and came to refer only to the actual activity of reaping, and autumn, as well as fall, began to replace it as a reference to the season.[10][11]
The alternative word fall for the season traces its origins to old Germanic languages. The exact derivation is unclear, with the Old English fiæll or feallan and the Old Norse fall all being possible candidates. However, these words all have the meaning “to fall from a height” and are clearly derived either from a common root or from each other. The term came to denote the season in 16th century England, a contraction of Middle English expressions like “fall of the leaf" and "fall of the year".[12]
During the 17th century, English emigration to the British colonies in North America was at its peak, and the new settlers took the English language with them. While the term fall gradually became obsolete in Britain, it became the more common term in North America.[citation needed]

Ahem:

Etymology[edit]

Autumn in suburban Canterbury, Victoria, Australia

The word autumn comes from the ancient Etruscan root autu- and has within it connotations of the passing of the year.[8] It was borrowed by the neighboring Romans, and became the Latin word autumnus.[9] After the Roman era the word continued to be used as the Old French word autompne (automne in modern French), and was later normalised to the original Latin. In theMedieval period there are rare examples of its use as early as the 12th century, but by the 16th century it was in common use.

Before the 16th century, harvest was the term usually used to refer to the season, as it is common in other West Germanic languagesto this day (cf. Dutch herfst, German Herbst and Scots hairst). However, as more people gradually moved from working the land to living in towns (especially those who could read and write,[citation needed] the only people whose use of language we now know), the word harvest lost its reference to the time of year and came to refer only to the actual activity of reaping, and autumn, as well as fall, began to replace it as a reference to the season.[10][11]

The alternative word fall for the season traces its origins to old Germanic languages. The exact derivation is unclear, with the Old English fiæll or feallan and the Old Norse fall all being possible candidates. However, these words all have the meaning “to fall from a height” and are clearly derived either from a common root or from each other. The term came to denote the season in 16th century England, a contraction of Middle English expressions like “fall of the leaf" and "fall of the year".[12]

During the 17th century, English emigration to the British colonies in North America was at its peak, and the new settlers took the English language with them. While the term fall gradually became obsolete in Britain, it became the more common term in North America.[citation needed]

Curetown fic in progress.  Aka, oh god this was supposed to be about 6 pages long at the most, and it’s not finished?!

Curetown fic in progress. Aka, oh god this was supposed to be about 6 pages long at the most, and it’s not finished?!